The KEY to Great Job Interviews

Bill Humbert, dba recruiterguy.com, is a corporate recruiter who has dedicated much of his life to matching talent with employer.  In Employee 5.0, he tells the job seeker what it takes to get into managerial roles and corner offices, all in an organized sales system sure to generate job offers in 90 days.  If you’ve been spit out of your corner office during downsizing, Humbert shows you how to dust off the uniform and get back on the field.

After a career of reading thousands of resumes, conducting thousands more interviews, and negotiating on every side of the table, Humbert says that one element of a job interview launches it from good to great:

Storytelling

In the book, Humbert asks you to make a list of your “impacts” and create stories around each one.  The people who interview you don’t say, “remember her great skirt?” They say “remember that woman who told the great story about doubling walk-up business with her phone?”

Which of the following would you remember?

“I sold 233 units in the first quarter, 233 in the next, 275 in the third and 299 at year’s end.”

“Last year, my final sales were up 33%. so I bought my wife a boat.”

Learn how to sharpen your professional career search skills while creating a warm, human approach to all you encounter on the hunt with Employee 5.0: Secrets of a Successful Job Hunt in the New World Order

The first step to getting that offer is getting them to remember who you are: Tell stories.  Not only will stand out from the crowd, you’ll soon be employed.

 

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/by Beth Wareham, editor in chief   @giantsweettart 

 

 

 

 

He’s left me. Let’s party!

It’s true; you’re divorcing. Whatever signaled the end – a loud booming fight or a harrowing lawn mower flight – it’s time for you to gather yourself, think about the future, and throw a damn great party to show the world you know how to take it on the chin with style.

Enter two young filmmakers, Mark Famiglietti and Lane Garrison, and their movie tie-in THE DIVORCE PARTY: 12 Steps to Celebrate the New You!.  In one nifty little book, they dish on marriage – and it’s dissolution –  factoids as well as history’s great divorce parties. In twelve clear steps, they show anyone how to plan and execute a divorce party that proclaims, “I’m an individual and here I am!”  It’s an ending, sure, but it’s a great beginning as well.

All over the world, reports of life-changing divorce parties are rolling in. Here’s just a sampling:

1. A woman in Cornwall, England rented a hot tub for her divorce party. It was so much fun she started a business renting and installing hot tubs all over Cornwall.

2. “Take It Back” ceremonies abound. Sometimes called a “reverse wedding”, a divorcing “bride” or “groom” walks through the marriage vows in reverse order, undoing their promises and releasing themselves – and their former partner – to the greater world.

3. “Never Scared” parties include skydiving, pole dancing, surfing and hang gliding. Many use the divorce as a moment to try a risky sport. Why not? Nothing more dangerous than marriage.

4. “I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outta My…” parties usually take place at a spa or retreat-like setting where women can symbolically exfoliate an ex and come home radiant and ready to rock and roll.

Pick up a copy of The Divorce Party:  12 Steps to Celebrate the New You! and start planning. Better yet, buy a copy for a friend and jump-start their joy. Today really is the first day of the rest of your life. Meet it with a smile on your face and an open heart. This time is for you.

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Divorce Parties Make Marriage Worth It

Ever been to a divorce party? Often times,  they’re much more interesting than the marriage whose ending they mark.

In The Divorce Party: 12 Steps to a Celebrate the New You , filmmakers turned first-time

authors Mark Famiglietti and Lane Garrison give every divorcing person 12 simple steps to creating the most fabulous, funniest party to mark an end and celebrate a beginning.  And why not? Everyone who has made the finish line KNOWS they deserve a party.

Publishing right into the heavy divorce time (it starts up every year the day after Valentine’s Day) and in plenty of time for the companion film’s summer release, The Divorce Party is sheer how-to with a wink and a smile, a reminder to make that lemonade in the face of struggle.

While this party has many of the aspects of other parties, it is unforgettable in most other ways — invites, dress, decorations, and mood.  The “ex” might be a part of the scene or never mentioned. A Las Vegas party went on for three days and included countless changes of clothes. Another divorce party was on a fishing boat (aluminum fishing boat).

Any spot can be the site of a great divorce party. All it takes is the will and imagination. And, if you can go to all the trouble of getting married, put some effort and get unmarried with style.

Grab a copy of this nifty little book or buy it for a friend and help them start planning. It will take their mind off of who gets the house.

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The Readiness is All: Layoffs

“Be looking for your next opportunity all the time,” says RecruiterGuy Bill Humbert in his new book, Employee 5.0, “because layoffs are the new normal. Employee 5.0 keeps the the job search on a simmer so that you can drive your career through whatever is going on.”

Retailers amazon and  B&N announced layoffs this week, sending hundreds of families into crisis management. But, does it have to be this way? If we know that corporations have adopted layoffs as an annual strategy to their stockholders, why not be ready?

Here are a few tips to keep your job search going even while you’re on the job:

  1. Keep a running list of your “impacts” at your current positition — the strengths you bring to the effort and the results of those strengths — as you do the job.  When you work hard, it’s easy to forget all the things you do that make you valuable to an organization. If the organization didn’t notice, that’s on them.
  2. Take calls from recruiters, hiring managers and job candidates. Offer assistance even if the call doesn’t immediately impact you. If you are helpful to someone, odds are, they’ll help you should you call.
  3. Network. In the new normal, we are all looking for a job all the time. This doesn’t mean you hit the cocktail party circuit, but you should show up every so often at industry events. Stay current and stay in touch with colleagues.

Employee 5.0 offers a new way in the new world, a 12-step program that results in job offers in 90 days, and puts the talent back in the driver’s seat.

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Careers have changed. Have you?

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He’s the RecruiterGuy, Bill Humbert, author of Employee 5.0, and he says the new normal requires that everyone have a job search on simmer.

Why? Because when markets tumble – and oh boy do they tumble – corporate leaders close ranks and begin shedding employees to collapse expenditures. Even after a career of great strategic moves, odds are in today’s world, you’ll find yourself on a job hunt you didn’t anticipate.

How can you find your power in such a powerless situation? ALWAYS HAVE A JOB SEARCH ON SIMMER, says Humbert. That’s right: No matter how much you might love your current job, keep looking.

Here’s are three ideas to give you a running jump on your next job search::

  1. No matter where you are in your career, take phone calls from recruiters and human resource executives. If you aren’t interested in the job, cultivate the contact and provide some great names for them to pursue. Stay in contact.
  2. Continually update your list of skills and impacts as you acquire more and more success in your position.  This helps you stay strong and confident in your skills while creating an important list for you to build upon for your next job search.
  3. Keep networking. Now, this doesn’t mean you have to go to two industry cocktail parties a week. This means you stay involved from time to time, show yourself, and offer support and ideas to others.

Humbert has made a bold promise in his new book Employee 5.0. In twelve steps worked diligently every day, Humbert says you’ll have a job in 90 days. We believe him; he sure has the clients to prove it.

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Powerful Words for the Downsized Soul

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In veteran corporate recruiter Bill Humbert’s new book, Employee 5.0, he confirms that we have a new normal. As markets shiver, so do the hiring and untiring practices of modern corporate America.

Most of us will find themselves in the “unhired” category sooner or later and it is at that moment, says Humbert, that you begin to heal. How! By celebrating your strengths. The first step in getting that next job is incredibly simple and incredibly powerful: Make a list of what you do well. Sit down for 20 minutes with a legal pad and begin:

  1. Turn your legal pad sideways; you’ll be writing in three columns across the page. On the left hand side, list your skills. It should look like “organized”, then underneath, “building creative campaigns for brand recognition”, then underneath that “managing creative teams.”
  2. In the middle column, cite the actual projects: company-wide calendar to create synergy; devised ten branding campaigns, and assembled and managed more than five teams.
  3. On the far right, write down the positive outcomes – or “impacts” as Humbert calls them – of your skills. Again, be specific. You might write, “created events with three other departments in company to create cross-promotions and cross-selling synergy”; “increased five clients’ brands by an average of 54%”; and “hired A-level creatives while saving more than 22% on expenditures. A list of awards for these campaigns includes…..”

Humbert, (aka Recruiterguy) goes on to lay out the next eleven steps to getting job offers in 90-days. Pick up a copy of Employee 5.0 and start using the new world order to get what YOU want out of your career.

 

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#writering: listening to the world’s music

This is a guest post by Bernard Holland, author of Something I Heard.

What keeps the stars from falling on our heads? Is some kind of heavenly geometry in play? Does it steer the planets along their predictable paths, keep them more or less collision free. And what takes those ever bigger bites out of the moon each month?

Modern science tells us with some authority (and with a bow to gravity) what holds the planets up but no explanation is quite so seductive as an idea that has held Western imagination since the time of the Greeks. It is called the Music of the Spheres _ an ancient astronomy that tells us that the skies can not only be seen but heard. It bids us put down our slide rules and calculators and then let it sing to us. How dry celestial maps appear in comparison.

The Music of the Spheres suggests that as we sit at our pianos and pick out progressions from, say, g-minor to D Major we are emulating in microcosm the measurements of the heavens. Pythagoras is our ground zero for this thinking, for not only did he promote the Music of the Spheres, he measured sound vibrations here on earth and in ways that gave us the musical scales on which several thousand years of Western music are based. The ancients and not so ancients took all this seriously. If music education today adds a little culture to our lives it was once believed to be essential and taught alongside mathematics and geometry. What better way to represent the universe at work?

What does this musIc sound like? We scarcely know. Plato says we hear it from birth but push it to the back of our minds.We know it’s there but its musicology escapes us. Maybe animals hear it better. Maybe we might pay more attention.

Shakespeare said, “The earth has music for those who listen.”

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Journalism and the price of progress

This is a guest blog by Judy Wieder, former editor-in-chief of The Advocate, the first woman to hold that position; and author of the memoir Random Events Tend To Cluster, a look at her life in the tumultuous years of fighting for human – and animal – rights. 
Research for Random Events Tend To Cluster

Necessity truly is the mother of invention. This includes the biggest invention of the millennium: the World Wide Web.  Slowly revealing itself as a miracle of communication—though one that’s hell-bent on replacing all other communications—the miraculous WWW has many sides, some bright as the sun, others murky as the night.

Officially established in the late 80s, by the early 2000s, a series of global catastrophes (natural and man-made) thrust the web into our lives like a speeding ambulance. Whether using its communication tools to find people lost amid the rubble of deadly terrorist attacks, or buried under the boulders of sudden earthquakes, or stranded on their rooftops after hurricanes, or swirling in the aftermath of  tsunamis—our need to locate and rescue each other made the Internet an information hub of unsurpassed  proportions.

Then the internet began speeding up the news coverage. The minute something happened anywhere, people knew about it everywhere. But is that always good? Something got lost in the immediacy of absolutely everything. And that something was our understanding.

Excerpt from chapter 10 of Random Events Tend To Cluster:

“Thankfully, amid Hurricane Katrina’s worst screw-ups in the history of emergencies, some agencies and individuals respond heroically. The Coast Guard rescues 34,000 stranded survivors. The Humane Society and other animal groups save more than 15,000 animals left behind by evacuees who thought they’d only be gone for a day.

From the ashes of government failures, new technologies for better crisis response are created. Emergency websites, maps, blogs, chat rooms, and help lines are posted and updated—all creating one online disaster community that will soon facilitate the rescue of so many people buried in 2010’s Haiti and 2015’s Nepal earthquakes; as well as those caught in 2017’s Hurricanes, Harvey and Maria.

As tech becomes the story of the new millennium, for me it becomes a good door through which I can leave my work of nearly 15 years. An LGBT Internet company buys our parent company. As with most online media, the “editorial wall” standing between content and advertising, blows over completely. Everywhere I look this once paramount wall is replaced by some mercurial gibberish ushered in by computers, the Internet, cellphones, tablets, and social media. The “highway of information,” as the Internet was once called, is now a shifty piece of work snapping up sound bites of things that have already taken place. For a nanosecond, we think we know something; we even pass it along to others who are grateful because now they think they know something. But, really, we’re all just echoes. What does it mean if we don’t understand it? And how can we understand it without context, backstory, investigation, questioning, and real analysis by professionals who know something to begin with and are willing to study to find out more? Without the connections that surround each breaking-news event, awareness goes on a very undernourished saga. Uncontextualized content is a moody, excitable thing that will leave us all anxious and starving.

Privately, I continue wondering how long we journalists are going to be okay with our content fighting for air amid a playground of advertising and product placement. Without authentic anything, who is going to be our Holden Caulfield (Catcher in the Rye) who grabs the media before it plunges way past mediocracy and crashes hard into clear evidence of a society in the toilet.”

Excerpt (c)  Random Events Tend To Cluster

Published by Lisa Hagan Books, 2017 www.lisahaganbooks.com

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Webinar: Explore the Replacement Child

FIRST OF ITS KIND WEBINAR TO DISCUSS REPLACEMENT CHILD SYNDROME, THE UNKNOWN PHENOMENON

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1 – 2 pm EST.

To register for the free webinar, visit ReplacementChild.net for additional information.

Experts weigh in on the often ignored but traumatic effects of being the “Replacement Child” and how it affects the people around them and the world.

(NATIONWIDE) Lisa Hagan Books, in collaboration with Psychology Today, a top mental health site that has dedicated itself to exploring the connections between mind, body, and spirit, will host The Replacement Child: The Unknown Phenomenon, a webinar focusing on Replacement Child syndrome on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at 1pm EST.

The Replacement Child is one who is conceived or adopted to fill the absence of a deceased child. Although the term “Replacement Child” was coined over 50 years ago, it has little to no presence in psychological and psychiatric studies and media.

The purpose of the webinar will be:
• To bring awareness to Replacement Child Syndrome and the effects it has on individuals and their families;
• To gain a more in-depth understanding of the Replacement Child phenomenon;
• To provide insight for professionals in the fields of psychology and psychiatry; and
• To introduce the idea of incorporating Replacement Child syndrome in post-secondary and doctoral psychology and psychiatry programs

Moderated by Hara Estroff Marano, Editor at Large for Psychology Today, the participants will be:

Barbara Jaffe, Ed.D., author of When Will I Be Good Enough? A Replacement Child’s Journey to Healinghttp://www.barbaraannjaffe.com

Abigail Brenner, MD, co-author of Replacement Children: The Unconscious Script http://www.abigailbrenner.com

Rita Battat Silverman, co-author of Replacement Children: The Unconscious Script http://www.ritabattatsilverman.com

Judy L. Mandel, author of Replacement Child – a memoir http://www.judymandel.com

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Judy Wieder is the author of Random Events Tend to Cluster, Lisa Hagan Books, 2017, her memoir of life at the forefront of the LGBT equal rights movement. This article first appeared on her blog, Intuitionsmedia.com.

Calling them “monsters” is too easy

By Judy Wieder

What’s wrong with making these people monsters?

Harvey Weinstein is the earthquake under the volcano. Bullying women (or anyone) into giving favors—sexual or otherwise—has been going on since the Greeks and Romans—maybe even the cavemen. In this decade alone, alleged sexual predators facing law suits include Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, Woody Allen, Bill O’Reilly, Casey Affleck, and the president of the United States.

Though it goes on everywhere, politics and the entertainment business in particular are so jacked-up with this conduct, it’s considered part of the landscape, part of the power, perks and payoffs. What, then, triggered this sudden resistance and potential reset?  If we stay with the metaphor, volcanos erupt when nearby earthquakes destabilize the the area; and earthquakes happen when the pressure building below the earth’s surface can no longer be contained. In other words, the victims said, “Enough!”

Like the proverbial candle in the dark, passed around to light thousands of other candles, when a handful of irate women hit their tipping point and tipped—the spark ignited. I believe at least half the energy blasting up the Weinstein Volcano was amassed over the last 10 months while women waited, stunned and seething, as absolutely nothing happened to Donald Trump after his “Grab them by the pussy/No one respects women more than I do,” psychotic break.

It was time. One thing or another was going to shatter the spell America’s been under since the election, and Harvey pulled the shit card! The mass awakening of the previously silent majority (“me too”), is the long-overdue opening we’ve been hoping for. It’s hard to be an abuser without a victim. And its hard to be a victim when you’re being heard! Speaking out can wipe out both the victim and the abuser in one powerful voice: the abuser loses control, and the victim gains it.

I too have traded my dignity for the wrong perks and carried that regret around for years— just read chapter three of my book (Random Events Tend To Cluster). It took me a very long time to tell myself, let alone others. But, despite the present and heartening roar of the betrayed, I see a very seductive trap we could easily fall into: That ol’ black and white, good and evil, simplification of “the problem.” This month, most of our successful news and entertainment media (you know, the “fake news”), have featured Harvey Weinstein in deliberately distorted photographs. This, of course, is a form of editorializing, clearly executed to make him look like a monster, not a human being. (And believe me, I have no sympathy for this man. That  is not my point. Neither is obstructing Freedom of the Press. Whether subtle or blatant, facts and opinions are all we have to help us navigate our world today. But we, alone, must sort out what is true by dragging it all through our own “shit-detectors.”)

I believe it’s far too easy to take a criminal like Weinstein and portray him as a monster, the “other,” something not human. What do we gain by doing that? Maybe that makes us feel better? Safer? “We could never be him. He’s a monster. Not human like us.”

Unfortunately he is human. Just like the Nazis were/are human beings. Trying to put them in a subhuman category will never allow us to understand them or their actions; thus guaranteeing a rerun. If we never know what drove an entire nation—in the middle of the “sophisticated” 20th century—to try to solve their economic problems by destroying millions of their fellow Europeans, especially the ones they saw as different from themselves—what’s to stop a sequel? Certainly not the terrified deniers. All those “good Germans” who stood around and said nothing were as bad as the Nazis; the entire holocaust could not have happened without them. And yet, they too were just other people. Not treacherous creatures we’ll never meet again. Without enlightenment about the past and present, these easily repeatable catastrophes await us tomorrow. The signs are everywhere.

When we hide any tragedy (sexual harassment, genocide, hate crimes, mass shootings) behind “they were monsters, villains, crazy terrorists, the axis of evil”—then they’ll be back. They’ll be back because we don’t know what happened in the first place. If we label a powerful mogul a “Monster,”  that person can hurt us. But if we let ourselves see someone—anyone—as human, everything changes. Information is available. Education is possible—not just for criminals, but for victims. And knowledge is power.  All the “monster” power we assign these people, can dissolve. Without fear, there is clarity: “Ohh, he’s just a jerk?? I thought he had something I needed, so I gave up my control; I handed him my power.”

Monsters are for Halloween. Damaged people are year round. I’ve always heard the first step to solving a problem is correctly identifying it. Deep breaths.

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#writering: #LGBT icon on Hollywood